Toxocara Canis

Perhaps better known as dog roundworm the embryonated eggs of which can be ingested by humans causing disease called toxocariasis. Young children are particularly at risk as it is picked up by ingestion of eggs from infected dog faeces. It is fortunately rare but rare things do happen. Dog mess is not only unpleasant but a potential source of an unpleasant infection.

This item is being reposted as another incident of dog fouling on The Oval and also on a street in the village was reported to the Parish Council. In the incident on The Oval the owner of the dog was challenged but refused to clean up. The vast majority of dog owners conscientiously clean up after their dogs and please continue to be vigilant when walking your dog. If users of The Oval see an infringement please continue to challenge and point out that there are bins provided.

Re-Pollarding of Pine Trees

 

Reference:

Please reply to:

Direct Line:

Direct Fax:

 

2016/1172/CAT

Planning Support

01572 720956

01572 758373

 

Date:

 

05-Dec-2016

TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING ACT 1990

PROPOSAL: (T1-T10) 10 no. Lime trees – re-pollarding (removing re-growth to suitable previous points) to maintain suitable size for their location and to clear electricity wires. (T11-T20) 10 no. Lime trees – re-pollard, to maintain suitable size for their location. (T21-T26) 6 no. Lime trees – re-pollard, to maintain suitable size for their location.

 North Luffenham Hall, Church Street, North Luffenham, OAKHAM, Rutland, LE15 8JR

An application for the above proposal has been received by the Local Planning Authority and you are invited to submit your comments thereon within 21 days from the date of this letter. The details of the application are available to view on our website www.rutland.gov.uk/planning by entering the reference number above.If you have received this letter electronically you can click onto the link below which will go straight to the relevant application:

http://planningonline.rutland.gov.uk/swift/apas/run/WPHAPPDETAIL.DisplayUrl?theApnID=2016/1172/CAT

Please email any comments you wish to make to planning@rutland.gov.uk.

Yours sincerely

Development Control Services

 

 

Latest Rutland South Police Crime Report

Received from PC Paul Le Pla as follows:

Here is the latest Rutland South beat report detailing crime for last month.

  • 2/11/16 – Theft from unattended motor vehicle – Lyddington
  • 2/11/16 – Attempt burglary (garage) Chater close, Manton
  • 5/11/16 –  Attempt burglary (garage) – Pinfold close South Luffenham
  • 5/11/16 – Theft from unattended motor vehicle  x 4 – Luffenham road and Dovecote close, Barrowden
  • 6/11/16 – Attempt Burglary dwelling _ Main street, Seaton
  • 12/11/16 – Damage – The Street, South Luffenham
  • 17/11/16 – Attempt Burglary other than dwelling – Barrowden community shop, Wakerley road, Barrowden
  • 23/11/16 – Burglary other than dwelling – Main street, Glaston
  • 23/11/16 – Burglary dwelling – Main street, Empingham
  • 22 – 25/11/16 – Burglary other than dwelling – Barrowden road, Ketton
  • 26 – 27/11/16 – Damage – Hall close play area, Ketton
  • 27/11/16 – Theft of trailer – Wood lane, Braunston

Our current Neighbourhood Priorities’ are –

      Tackling crime in Barrowden village due to the recent spike in crime there. We are carrying out high visibility patrols and liaising with surrounding forces sharing intelligence and information.
      Targeting hare coursing  along the A47 corridor from Uppingham to Tixover & parts of the north beat area from Langham towards the A1. Last month, members of the public reported to police numerous reports of hare coursing. As a result several people and vehicles have been identified as taking part in this illegal activity.

I would encourage you all to be vigilant and report any persons you suspect as acting suspicious. Take note of any vehicle and registration number they are in and ring the police on 101.

By all means, let me know and your Neighbourhood watch coordinators, but ring 101 in the first instance, so the information can be reported and acted upon straightaway.

Remember to visit the Rural Watch website, via the below link for rural crime updates and a whole host of crime prevention advice.

www.leics.police.uk/ruralwatch

Are you having a pre-Christmas clear out?

Your village school needs you help.

We are currently collecting items for our Christmas Fete on Saturday 10th December. We are looking for general tombola items, used toys and books and clean re lovable teddy bears.

Please drop off any donations to the school office before Friday 9th December.

Any help is greatly appreciated. All proceeds from the fete go to the school PFA (money raised then goes back into the school to benefit the children)

Tina Sewell

Next Meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council (Trustee)

The next meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council (as Trustee for The Oval and Allotment Field Gardens) will be on Monday, 5th December 2016, immediately following the Parish Council meeting in the Community Centre.  The Agenda and associated papers are listed below.

Next Meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council

The next meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council will be held at 7pm on Monday 5th December 2016 in the Community Centre.  Please note the earlier start time.

The agenda and associated papers are listed below.

South Luffenham Ghost Story

NEW PERSPECTIVES THEATRE – OH WHISTLE AND I’LL COME TO YOU (based on the classic ghost story by M. R. James)

Tickets are now available for the New Perspectives Theatre Company’s showing of Oh Whistle and I’ll Come to You which will be in South Luffenham Village Hall at 7.30pm on Tuesday 6th December. 

The tickets cost £10 each and can be purchased from Malcolm, phone 720687 or Noel, phone 720112.

Suitable for audience age 14+years.  Running time: 90 mins + interval

 A prying hand brings forth from centuries of sleep… a mysterious thing… it seems a whistle… and on it engraved… these ominous words… WHO’S THAT COMING

Professor Parkins takes a room at The Globe.

Away from Cambridge, a peaceful coastal retreat with minimal interruption from the inn’s young valet should be perfect for writing. But on taking a walk to explore the area, Parkins finds an ancient whistle with a soul-stirring inscription. Choosing to ignore its warning, the professor is soon to discover he is not alone…

Widely regarded as the father of the modern ghost story, M. R. James’ eerie tale is re-imagined by David Rudkin, described by the Observer as ‘Britain’s greatest living dramatic poet’ into this new Christmas chiller. This production marks David Rudkin’s 80th year and the 80th anniversary of the death of M.R. James.

These events are sponsored by Centre Stage which subsidise the cost and make live theatre affordable for local communities.

200 villagers attend Service of Remembrance 2016

On Sunday 13th November, just before 11am some 200 Villagers, together with Parishioners from local Parishes within the Benefice and Military Personnel from 1 Military Working Dog Regiment (1MWD Regt), 2 Medical Regiment RAMC, St George’s Barracks Army Cadet Force Detachment and members of North Luffenham Scouts gathered to remember those who gave their lives in two World Wars and those that lost their lives on operations and training in more recent times.

The Service was led by Rev John Taylor and our Lay Reader Caroline Simmonds.

caroline-simmonds-and-rev-john-taylor

Caroline Simmonds and Rev John Taylor lead the Commemoration

Senior Military Guests included Air Vice Marshal Nigel Sudborough CB, President of The Royal British Legion, Rutland and Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC Commanding Officer 1 MWD Regt and Station Commander at St George’s Barracks.

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC, Commanding Officer 1 Military Working Dog Regiment

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC, Commanding Officer 1 Military Working Dog Regiment

The Standards of the Royal Air Forces Association, 1 MWD Regt, North Luffenham Scouts, and Army Cadet Force Paraded outside the Church and took part in the Service and Commemoration.

L-R Standards of Army Cadet Force, RAFA and Wreath Layers from Scouts, Royal British Legion (AVM Nigel Sudborough, 1 MWD Regt (Lt Col Foreman) and 2 Med Regt RAMC.

L-R Standards of Army Cadet Force, RAFA and Wreath Layers from Scouts, Royal British Legion (AVM Nigel Sudborough, 1 MWD Regt (Lt Col Foreman) and 2 Med Regt RAMC.

During the Service the names of some 86 British and Commonwealth Fallen were read out and remembered with great solemnity and pride.

Following the service the congregation gathered outside and Wreaths were laid in front of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission plot.

Choir and Congregation gather at the Commonwealth War Graves Plot

Choir and Congregation gather at the Commonwealth War Graves Plot

The Collection for the Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal raised £566.

Service of Remembrance – First World War Centenary

poppyA Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am tomorrow, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

In this the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme we will particularly remember those who died during the First World War.

dsc_0440

You can read about the 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from this series published during the past week.

We Will Remember Them

poppy-field

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

Extract from Poem by Robert Laurence Binyon (1869-1943), published in The Times newspaper on 21st September 1914.

World War II Fallen

In this final piece on Remembrance we remember too those from the village that gave their lives in World War 2. We remember:

  • JOHN CHARITY
  • RALPH CHARITY
  • WILLIAM PALMER
  • GEORGE HARRISON
  • FA LOCKE
  • JACK ALEXANDER

Whilst books such as “Rutland The Great War” provide a comprehensive list of the fallen with awards of merit, photographs and list of actions for that War, there appears to be no similar record of those who lost their lives in 1939 – 1945. Indeed in researching these pieces I have been unable even to find even the Regimental Numbers /Rank / First Names of all those listed above.

Should any villager have further details we would love to be able to include them in the village archive. Hopefully next year we can produce a summary of these men who too gave their lives in War.

Commonwealth War Graves

b0003278

We remember too those Servicemen who lie buried in the beautiful Commonwealth War Graves Commission plot in the Village Churchyard:

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL ARTILLERY

  • GUNNER PK MOORE

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE

  • SERGEANT E HORTON
  • AIRCRAFTMAN FG MALIN
  • AIRCRAFTMAN G ROBERTS
  • SERGEANT AB WRIGHT
  • SERGEANT WD MORRIS
  • SERGEANT BF MULLETT
  • SERGEANT KH LONG
  • CORPORAL LA SURGEON
  • CORPORAL H BROGAN
  • CHIEF TECHNICIAN DM HIGGINS
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN DT ROGERS
  • JUNIOR TECHNICIAN DB DOMINY
  • SERGEANT RA LIGHT
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN SA SHARP
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN F BOWEN

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE

  • SERGEANT HD WEAVER
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT JR YOUNG
  • SERGEANT RG WALTERS
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT RH LEWIS
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT KL CAMPBELL
  • FLYING OFFICER AE RAYNER
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN TA McNEILLY
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT EK CHURCHILL
  • SQUADRON LEADER JD DICKSON
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN CH ROSIN
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN KS WILKINGS
  • FLYING OFFICER DG TRACEY
  • FLYING OFFICER LJ ELPHICK
  • FLYING OFFICER AM GILLIES
  • FLYING OFFICER PV ROBINSON
  • SERGEANT M LAING

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL NEW ZEALAND AIR FORCE

  • FLIGHT SERGEANT DLC LIDDELL
  • SERGEANT H MORRISON
  • SERGEANT LF CROKER
  • SERGEANT T LINDLEY

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

  • FLIGHT SERGEANT JA DOUGLAS

poppies-remembrance

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

 

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 5

Field of Poppies

15062 Private James Leonard Steele

James Leonard Steele was the eldest son of William and Rose Steele and born in North Luffenham on 11 August 1895. By 1911, aged 15, he had moved within the village to live with his grandfather Jeremiah Steele and was a farm labourer.

He enlisted in Oakham, joining the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards on 5 January 1915, aged 19 years and 5 months old. He went out to France the following October where he took part in the fighting on the Somme.

James was wounded on 16 August 1916 and again on 4 May 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres. At some point he transferred to the Labour Corps.

He returned home and married his wife Mabel in October 1918. But just five weeks later he was dead. James had been struck down in the big ‘flu outbreak that hit Europe and the world immediately after the war, but his illness was said to have been aggravated by his wounds.

He is buried at North Luffenham churchyard, and has a CWGC headstone. He was 23 years old. His cousin Hugh Steele and his second cousin John Henry Steele also died in the First World War.

12760 Private John Henry Steele

John Henry Steele was the son of Amon and Charlotte Steele and was born in North Luffenham in 1896. He was a cousin of Hugh Steele of Exton and James Leonard Steele, who is buried in North Luffenham churchyard, as John’s grandfather was the brother of their grandfather.

His father Amon died in his thirties before the war, and John’s mother Charlotte remarried and the family moved to Northamptonshire.

John Henry was known as Harry and joined 6th Battalion King’s Shropshire Light Infantry. Little more is known about his war service, except that he died fighting in Belgium on 26 June 1916 and is buried at Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, grave III.B.17. He is not remembered on any war memorial in Rutland.

25753 Private Herbert Henry Storey

Herbert Henry Storey was the second youngest Rutlander to die in the First World War, aged just 16 years, ten months and ten days, after he was injured during the Battle of the Somme.

The youngest of all to die was William Clifton. Herbert, whose cousin Albert also died in the war, was born at at Ketton on 26 December 1899, the son of Herbert Storey and lived at New Town Cottages in North Luffenham. He enlisted in Mansfield, where he worked as a coalminer, on 3 May 1915, claiming to be 19 years, 127 days.

He went to France on 6 March 1916 with the 16th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). During the Battle of the Somme, on 14 October 1916, 100 men of the battalion were sent to act as stretcher bearers during an attack by 118th Brigade on the Schwaben Redoubt near Thiepval. It is likely this was the action in which Herbert was wounded.

He was admitted to hospital in Rouen with a head wound before being evacuated home. He died in St George’s Hospital, London, at 12.45am on 22 October. Herbert was buried two days later at Nunhead Cemetery in South London and is remembered on North Luffenham’s war memorial.

10536 Private Charles Edward Thornton

Charles Edward Thornton was initially rejected for military service because of a heart condition. But he made another attempt to join up and managed to enlist in the Lincolnshire Regiment just three weeks after the start of the First World War.

He was younger of two sons of Lewis and Mary Thornton of North Luffenham. Lewis was a butcher in the village, but both his sons trained to be bakers. Charles worked in Nottingham and then in Wragby, Lincolnshire, while his brother George worked in Loughborough.

Charles attested for the army at Lincoln and joined the 6th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment. He was sent to Malta and then to Gallipoli when the British made new landings at Suvla Bay in an attempt to break the deadlock in the fighting which had been going on since April. He was shot in the stomach and died from his wounds on 11 August 1915.

He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 47 of the Helles Memorial as well as at home in North Luffenham church. His brother George, who had joined up the day after him, was discharged from the army in October 1914 as medically unfit.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 4

Field of Poppies

3088 Private George Liddamore

We do not know very much about George Liddamore. His name appears on the war memorial in St John the Baptist Church in North Luffenham but George is not mentioned in George Phillips’ Rutland and the Great War. It maybe he was the 24 year old son of George and Phoebe Liddamore who were living in North Luffenham at the time of the First World War and in their fifties, If he was, then he was living away from home in Grantham and worked as a gamekeeper.

What we can be certain of is that George Liddamore served with the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Mesopotamia [Iraq]. The battalion joined the Tigris Corps which made an unsuccessful attempt to relieve the siege of Kut-el-Amarrah.

George was killed on 21 April 1916, a week before Kut surrendered. He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 9 of the Basra Memorial and in North Luffenham church.

38237 Private Arthur William Morby

Arthur William Morby was just 19 when he died, one of around 45 “Teenage Tommies” from Rutland to have been killed in the First World War.

He was the son of George and Annie Morby, of North Luffenham, and was a Private in the Gloucestershire Regiment.

He was buried in France, at Hanguard Communal Cemetery, grave II.B.6, and is remembered on the war memorial in the church at North Luffenham.

24954 Private George Henry Saddington

George Henry Saddington was the eldest son of Charles and Anne Saddington and was born in North Luffenham in the summer of 1891. He had four younger siblings. George served with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

On 15 September 1916 the Leicestershire’s were part of 71st Infantry Brigade which took part in an ambitious attack aimed at capturing Morval, Lesbouefs, Gueudecourt and Flers during the Battle of the Somme. The battalion war diary described what happened:

“At about 5.50am two enemy aeroplanes appeared above us but did not stay long. About this time also a tank was noticed on our right moving quietly up to the enemy’s front line. On arriving there he immediately opened fire with his machine guns enfilading the German trenches on either side. He was very heavily fired on by the enemy’s machine guns which apparently had no effect.” Zero hour was fixed for 6.20am. “The leading Companies advanced at the walk at 30 yards distance between lines. A heavy machine gun was immediately opened by the enemy. The support Companies followed in the same formation 300 yards in rear of last wave of leading Company.” Things were beginning to go wrong. “The mist and smoke was terribly thick and allowed no observation by support Companies and Battalion HQ as to exactly what was happening…throughout the advance the battalion suffered very heavily from machine gun fire…and held up by very strong and undamaged wire in front of Quadrilateral [a German strong point].”

The attack petered out and eventually the Leicestershires were forced to withdraw with casualties of 14 officers and 410 men killed and wounded, including four others from Rutland. George has no known grave but is remembered on Pier 3A of the Thiepval Memorial as well as on the memorial in North Luffenham Church.

2596 Corporal Bertie H Smith

Bertie H Smith was born in Edith Weston in 1882 but records show his parents David and Hannah Smith were living in North Luffenham at the time. He was one of six brothers. Bertie became a joiner and moved to Oakham with his wife Annie Louise and their small son, Cyril Bertie Smith.

He joined the Leicestershire Regiment and served in Ireland after the Easter Uprising with the 2nd/5th Battalion. His death was the result of a tragic accident when he and another soldier drowned in floods as they were collecting stores with a horse and cart. In a letter sent to a Mr S Daniels who tried to help the pair, the Major General commanding the 59th Division based at Curragh Camp wrote:

“I have read with much satisfaction a report of your courageous action on the evening of the 17th November 1916 at Fermoy, when you endeavoured to assist Corpl. Smith and Pte. Jewell of the 2nd/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment who were in great danger on account of heavy floods washing past the bridge over the River Blackwater with a Government Horse and Cart. It is a matter of regret that the lives of the two soldiers were not saved, but this does not detract in any way [of] your action, and I desire on behalf of the military authorities, to thank you very cordially for your courageous attempt to help them in their difficulties at the risk of your own life.”

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has the date of death the following day, 18 November 1916. Bertie, who was around 34, is buried at Fermoy Military Cemetery in County Cork. Graves are not individually marked and so he is named on the Screen Wall with Hedley Jewell who died with him. He is also remembered on North Luffenham’s war memorial.

38236 Private George Edward Smith

George Edward Smith was the son of Charles and Kate Smith, and had a sister, Lily. He was born in North Luffenham around 1898 and served with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

He died as a prisoner of war at the end of March 1918 aged 19. After the war his body was moved to Mons (Bergen) Communal Cemetery, grave VII.D.12.

He is remembered on the war memorial at North Luffenham.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Approved Parish Council Minutes for 5th September 2016

Listed below are the approved minutes of the Parish Council meeting and the Parish Council (Trust) meeting for 5th September 2016, which replace the watermarked ‘draft’ versions of the same date.