Author Archives: Paul Cummings

Security Marking – Sat 28th October 2017 at 3pm in The Fox

PC Peter Icke, our Community Police Officer reports that there has been an increase in burglaries and break-ins recently across Rutland and the surrounding areas. He has kindly agreed to hold a property marking event at The Fox on Saturday 28th October from 3pm. As well as marking Garden tools, lawnmowers, bikes etc, he will have available UV pens and a selection of shed alarms, timer switches, smart water kits and information to help you secure your home.

North Luffenham Parish Council (Trustee) Meeting – Monday 16th September 2016

The next meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council (Trustee for The Oval and Allotment Field) will be held on Monday 16th October, immediately following the Parish Council meeting in the Community Centre. The Agenda and associated papers are listed below:

agenda-trust-20171016

NLPC Trust accounts-09.10.2017

Request to Trustee 2017

Policy-Allotment Letting-draftv1

 

 

North Luffenham Parish Council – Next Meeting Monday 16th October 2017

The next meeting of North Luffenham Parish Council will be held at 7pm on Monday 16th October 2017 in the Community Centre.

 

The agenda and associated papers are listed below:

NLPC-agenda-General-16.10.2017

NLPC-accounts-General-09.10.2017

NLPC Response to Draft Local Plan

Bonfire Event Plan-Risk Analysis

NLPC meeting dates to April 2019

 

Volunteers Needed – Bonfire Night Sunday 5th November 2017

The Parish Council Bonfire Night Working Group are now finalizing the arrangements for Bonfire Night 2017. The event will take place on Sunday 5th Nov 17 on the Oval. ‘Doors’ will open at 6pm and the bonfire will be lit at around 6.10pm and fireworks will commence around 6.30 pm. There will be a competition for the best ‘Guy’ and drinks and hot refreshments will be available at very reasonable prices. To make the event a success we need to raise some £2,500 on the night through collections and sales.

We are now looking for volunteers to assist with Stewarding, Bucket Collections, Management of Fireworks and Catering support. We would be most grateful for any offers of assistance to ensure that the event can be both safe and successful. If you can help please call:

Paul Cummings: 01780 720124 or Charles Cade: 01780 720467

Public Meeting – The Future of St George’s Barracks – Thursday 26th October 2017

There will be a public meeting in the School Hall on Thursday 26th Oct 17 at 7PM to discuss the proposals for the future development of St George’s Barracks. The meeting will be addressed by Helen Briggs, Chief Executive of Rutland County Council who will discuss the outline proposal  and explain how the proposed Partnership with MoD will work.

This is an opportunity to hear at first hand what is proposed and to address the Chief Executive. This initiative will have a significant impact on the village over the next 20 years and I do hope that as many as possible will take the opportunity to hear what is planned and to have an opportunity to help shape the future of the Barracks site, a significant portion of which currently lies within the village boundary.

More background information here:

Future of St George’s Barracks

Should you have any questions or would wish to register questions in advance of the meeting please contact:

Paul Cummings, Parish Council Chair – Tel: 01780 720124 or pbgcummings@gmail.com

Future of St George’s Barracks

On 25th Sep Cllrs Cummings and Smith attended a briefing held jointly by Rutland County Council and the Ministry of Defence (MoD). The aim of the meeting was to outline how the County Council and MoD intended to work in Partnership to identify the most appropriate future use of the site in line with the Councils objectives and requirements and to secure the best possible outcome for St George’s site, local communities and the wider county.

The key points raised by the Chief Executive in her introduction were:

  • The MoD decided last year that St George’s Barracks would close by 2021 – this decision at present remains extant.
  • Since then MoD and RCC have been in active discussions about the possibility of developing a Private/Private Partnership designed to maximize the potential for the site.
  • The site was a 300 Hectare Brownfield site with enormous potential in a most favorable position close to A1 / A47, and Rutland Water.

CE RCC identified the shared vision that was being developed. The intent was to create:

  • A new ‘Garden village’, – the new village would be well-designed, built to a high quality and attractive to meet local housing needs, including affordable housing.
  • A business enterprise zone
  • Leisure and recreation facilities
  • Minerals extraction

She indicated that this would be a long term project with phased development over 10-15 years. With supporting infrastructure, including roads, Utilities, Broadband etc being put in place prior to development.

The Parish Council have indicated their wish to work closely with MoD and to be able to represent the views of the villagers of North Luffenham. Helen Briggs, the Chief Executive has agreed to come to North Luffenham to present the Council’s vision to the village. Plans are being drawn up to hold this meeting on 25th or 26th October. Further details will be published in due course.

A Question and Answer brief prepared by Rutland County Council is attached.

Q&A Brief – Sep 17

PBG CUMMINGS

Chair North Luffenham Parish Council

200 villagers attend Service of Remembrance 2016

On Sunday 13th November, just before 11am some 200 Villagers, together with Parishioners from local Parishes within the Benefice and Military Personnel from 1 Military Working Dog Regiment (1MWD Regt), 2 Medical Regiment RAMC, St George’s Barracks Army Cadet Force Detachment and members of North Luffenham Scouts gathered to remember those who gave their lives in two World Wars and those that lost their lives on operations and training in more recent times.

The Service was led by Rev John Taylor and our Lay Reader Caroline Simmonds.

caroline-simmonds-and-rev-john-taylor

Caroline Simmonds and Rev John Taylor lead the Commemoration

Senior Military Guests included Air Vice Marshal Nigel Sudborough CB, President of The Royal British Legion, Rutland and Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC Commanding Officer 1 MWD Regt and Station Commander at St George’s Barracks.

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC, Commanding Officer 1 Military Working Dog Regiment

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Foreman RLC, Commanding Officer 1 Military Working Dog Regiment

The Standards of the Royal Air Forces Association, 1 MWD Regt, North Luffenham Scouts, and Army Cadet Force Paraded outside the Church and took part in the Service and Commemoration.

L-R Standards of Army Cadet Force, RAFA and Wreath Layers from Scouts, Royal British Legion (AVM Nigel Sudborough, 1 MWD Regt (Lt Col Foreman) and 2 Med Regt RAMC.

L-R Standards of Army Cadet Force, RAFA and Wreath Layers from Scouts, Royal British Legion (AVM Nigel Sudborough, 1 MWD Regt (Lt Col Foreman) and 2 Med Regt RAMC.

During the Service the names of some 86 British and Commonwealth Fallen were read out and remembered with great solemnity and pride.

Following the service the congregation gathered outside and Wreaths were laid in front of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission plot.

Choir and Congregation gather at the Commonwealth War Graves Plot

Choir and Congregation gather at the Commonwealth War Graves Plot

The Collection for the Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal raised £566.

Service of Remembrance – First World War Centenary

poppyA Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am tomorrow, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

In this the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme we will particularly remember those who died during the First World War.

dsc_0440

You can read about the 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from this series published during the past week.

We Will Remember Them

poppy-field

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

Extract from Poem by Robert Laurence Binyon (1869-1943), published in The Times newspaper on 21st September 1914.

World War II Fallen

In this final piece on Remembrance we remember too those from the village that gave their lives in World War 2. We remember:

  • JOHN CHARITY
  • RALPH CHARITY
  • WILLIAM PALMER
  • GEORGE HARRISON
  • FA LOCKE
  • JACK ALEXANDER

Whilst books such as “Rutland The Great War” provide a comprehensive list of the fallen with awards of merit, photographs and list of actions for that War, there appears to be no similar record of those who lost their lives in 1939 – 1945. Indeed in researching these pieces I have been unable even to find even the Regimental Numbers /Rank / First Names of all those listed above.

Should any villager have further details we would love to be able to include them in the village archive. Hopefully next year we can produce a summary of these men who too gave their lives in War.

Commonwealth War Graves

b0003278

We remember too those Servicemen who lie buried in the beautiful Commonwealth War Graves Commission plot in the Village Churchyard:

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL ARTILLERY

  • GUNNER PK MOORE

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE

  • SERGEANT E HORTON
  • AIRCRAFTMAN FG MALIN
  • AIRCRAFTMAN G ROBERTS
  • SERGEANT AB WRIGHT
  • SERGEANT WD MORRIS
  • SERGEANT BF MULLETT
  • SERGEANT KH LONG
  • CORPORAL LA SURGEON
  • CORPORAL H BROGAN
  • CHIEF TECHNICIAN DM HIGGINS
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN DT ROGERS
  • JUNIOR TECHNICIAN DB DOMINY
  • SERGEANT RA LIGHT
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN SA SHARP
  • SENIOR AIRCRAFTMAN F BOWEN

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE

  • SERGEANT HD WEAVER
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT JR YOUNG
  • SERGEANT RG WALTERS
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT RH LEWIS
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT KL CAMPBELL
  • FLYING OFFICER AE RAYNER
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN TA McNEILLY
  • FLIGHT SERGEANT EK CHURCHILL
  • SQUADRON LEADER JD DICKSON
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN CH ROSIN
  • LEADING AIRCRAFTMAN KS WILKINGS
  • FLYING OFFICER DG TRACEY
  • FLYING OFFICER LJ ELPHICK
  • FLYING OFFICER AM GILLIES
  • FLYING OFFICER PV ROBINSON
  • SERGEANT M LAING

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL NEW ZEALAND AIR FORCE

  • FLIGHT SERGEANT DLC LIDDELL
  • SERGEANT H MORRISON
  • SERGEANT LF CROKER
  • SERGEANT T LINDLEY

 

SERVICEMEN OF THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

  • FLIGHT SERGEANT JA DOUGLAS

poppies-remembrance

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

 

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 5

Field of Poppies

15062 Private James Leonard Steele

James Leonard Steele was the eldest son of William and Rose Steele and born in North Luffenham on 11 August 1895. By 1911, aged 15, he had moved within the village to live with his grandfather Jeremiah Steele and was a farm labourer.

He enlisted in Oakham, joining the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards on 5 January 1915, aged 19 years and 5 months old. He went out to France the following October where he took part in the fighting on the Somme.

James was wounded on 16 August 1916 and again on 4 May 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres. At some point he transferred to the Labour Corps.

He returned home and married his wife Mabel in October 1918. But just five weeks later he was dead. James had been struck down in the big ‘flu outbreak that hit Europe and the world immediately after the war, but his illness was said to have been aggravated by his wounds.

He is buried at North Luffenham churchyard, and has a CWGC headstone. He was 23 years old. His cousin Hugh Steele and his second cousin John Henry Steele also died in the First World War.

12760 Private John Henry Steele

John Henry Steele was the son of Amon and Charlotte Steele and was born in North Luffenham in 1896. He was a cousin of Hugh Steele of Exton and James Leonard Steele, who is buried in North Luffenham churchyard, as John’s grandfather was the brother of their grandfather.

His father Amon died in his thirties before the war, and John’s mother Charlotte remarried and the family moved to Northamptonshire.

John Henry was known as Harry and joined 6th Battalion King’s Shropshire Light Infantry. Little more is known about his war service, except that he died fighting in Belgium on 26 June 1916 and is buried at Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, grave III.B.17. He is not remembered on any war memorial in Rutland.

25753 Private Herbert Henry Storey

Herbert Henry Storey was the second youngest Rutlander to die in the First World War, aged just 16 years, ten months and ten days, after he was injured during the Battle of the Somme.

The youngest of all to die was William Clifton. Herbert, whose cousin Albert also died in the war, was born at at Ketton on 26 December 1899, the son of Herbert Storey and lived at New Town Cottages in North Luffenham. He enlisted in Mansfield, where he worked as a coalminer, on 3 May 1915, claiming to be 19 years, 127 days.

He went to France on 6 March 1916 with the 16th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). During the Battle of the Somme, on 14 October 1916, 100 men of the battalion were sent to act as stretcher bearers during an attack by 118th Brigade on the Schwaben Redoubt near Thiepval. It is likely this was the action in which Herbert was wounded.

He was admitted to hospital in Rouen with a head wound before being evacuated home. He died in St George’s Hospital, London, at 12.45am on 22 October. Herbert was buried two days later at Nunhead Cemetery in South London and is remembered on North Luffenham’s war memorial.

10536 Private Charles Edward Thornton

Charles Edward Thornton was initially rejected for military service because of a heart condition. But he made another attempt to join up and managed to enlist in the Lincolnshire Regiment just three weeks after the start of the First World War.

He was younger of two sons of Lewis and Mary Thornton of North Luffenham. Lewis was a butcher in the village, but both his sons trained to be bakers. Charles worked in Nottingham and then in Wragby, Lincolnshire, while his brother George worked in Loughborough.

Charles attested for the army at Lincoln and joined the 6th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment. He was sent to Malta and then to Gallipoli when the British made new landings at Suvla Bay in an attempt to break the deadlock in the fighting which had been going on since April. He was shot in the stomach and died from his wounds on 11 August 1915.

He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 47 of the Helles Memorial as well as at home in North Luffenham church. His brother George, who had joined up the day after him, was discharged from the army in October 1914 as medically unfit.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 4

Field of Poppies

3088 Private George Liddamore

We do not know very much about George Liddamore. His name appears on the war memorial in St John the Baptist Church in North Luffenham but George is not mentioned in George Phillips’ Rutland and the Great War. It maybe he was the 24 year old son of George and Phoebe Liddamore who were living in North Luffenham at the time of the First World War and in their fifties, If he was, then he was living away from home in Grantham and worked as a gamekeeper.

What we can be certain of is that George Liddamore served with the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Mesopotamia [Iraq]. The battalion joined the Tigris Corps which made an unsuccessful attempt to relieve the siege of Kut-el-Amarrah.

George was killed on 21 April 1916, a week before Kut surrendered. He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 9 of the Basra Memorial and in North Luffenham church.

38237 Private Arthur William Morby

Arthur William Morby was just 19 when he died, one of around 45 “Teenage Tommies” from Rutland to have been killed in the First World War.

He was the son of George and Annie Morby, of North Luffenham, and was a Private in the Gloucestershire Regiment.

He was buried in France, at Hanguard Communal Cemetery, grave II.B.6, and is remembered on the war memorial in the church at North Luffenham.

24954 Private George Henry Saddington

George Henry Saddington was the eldest son of Charles and Anne Saddington and was born in North Luffenham in the summer of 1891. He had four younger siblings. George served with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

On 15 September 1916 the Leicestershire’s were part of 71st Infantry Brigade which took part in an ambitious attack aimed at capturing Morval, Lesbouefs, Gueudecourt and Flers during the Battle of the Somme. The battalion war diary described what happened:

“At about 5.50am two enemy aeroplanes appeared above us but did not stay long. About this time also a tank was noticed on our right moving quietly up to the enemy’s front line. On arriving there he immediately opened fire with his machine guns enfilading the German trenches on either side. He was very heavily fired on by the enemy’s machine guns which apparently had no effect.” Zero hour was fixed for 6.20am. “The leading Companies advanced at the walk at 30 yards distance between lines. A heavy machine gun was immediately opened by the enemy. The support Companies followed in the same formation 300 yards in rear of last wave of leading Company.” Things were beginning to go wrong. “The mist and smoke was terribly thick and allowed no observation by support Companies and Battalion HQ as to exactly what was happening…throughout the advance the battalion suffered very heavily from machine gun fire…and held up by very strong and undamaged wire in front of Quadrilateral [a German strong point].”

The attack petered out and eventually the Leicestershires were forced to withdraw with casualties of 14 officers and 410 men killed and wounded, including four others from Rutland. George has no known grave but is remembered on Pier 3A of the Thiepval Memorial as well as on the memorial in North Luffenham Church.

2596 Corporal Bertie H Smith

Bertie H Smith was born in Edith Weston in 1882 but records show his parents David and Hannah Smith were living in North Luffenham at the time. He was one of six brothers. Bertie became a joiner and moved to Oakham with his wife Annie Louise and their small son, Cyril Bertie Smith.

He joined the Leicestershire Regiment and served in Ireland after the Easter Uprising with the 2nd/5th Battalion. His death was the result of a tragic accident when he and another soldier drowned in floods as they were collecting stores with a horse and cart. In a letter sent to a Mr S Daniels who tried to help the pair, the Major General commanding the 59th Division based at Curragh Camp wrote:

“I have read with much satisfaction a report of your courageous action on the evening of the 17th November 1916 at Fermoy, when you endeavoured to assist Corpl. Smith and Pte. Jewell of the 2nd/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment who were in great danger on account of heavy floods washing past the bridge over the River Blackwater with a Government Horse and Cart. It is a matter of regret that the lives of the two soldiers were not saved, but this does not detract in any way [of] your action, and I desire on behalf of the military authorities, to thank you very cordially for your courageous attempt to help them in their difficulties at the risk of your own life.”

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has the date of death the following day, 18 November 1916. Bertie, who was around 34, is buried at Fermoy Military Cemetery in County Cork. Graves are not individually marked and so he is named on the Screen Wall with Hedley Jewell who died with him. He is also remembered on North Luffenham’s war memorial.

38236 Private George Edward Smith

George Edward Smith was the son of Charles and Kate Smith, and had a sister, Lily. He was born in North Luffenham around 1898 and served with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

He died as a prisoner of war at the end of March 1918 aged 19. After the war his body was moved to Mons (Bergen) Communal Cemetery, grave VII.D.12.

He is remembered on the war memorial at North Luffenham.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 3

Field of Poppies

17232 Private Joseph Henry Boothby

Joseph Henry Boothby was the son of Aubin John Boothby (a domestic gardener) and Charlotte Boothby of North Luffenham and was born in Alconbury on 29 August 1889.

He joined the Leicestershire Regiment in March 1915, and went out to France the following May to join C Company of the 2nd Battalion.

He took part in the Battle of Loos, and was killed on 25 September 1915.

He has no known grave and so is remembered on panel 43 of the Loos Memorial and the war memorial in the church in North Luffenham.

windoostan-leices

The Royal Leicestershire Regiment

201499 Private Cecil Bailie Gage Killips

Cecil Bailie Gage Killips and his brother William from North Luffenham both died in the First World War.

Cecil was born at Ballinasloe, County Galway, Ireland, on 12 April 1897, the son of Robert (a stud groom) and Hannah Killips who later moved to Rutland.

Cecil worked as a moulder and joined up on 26 March 1915, going to the Western Front on 17 March 1916 with the 1st/4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment. He fought in France and Belgium, and according to George Phillips “was a first class machine gunner and bomber.”

He was killed by a shell on 10 October 1917, at Lens, and was buried at Philosophe British Cemetery, grave II.V.3, one of ten Rutland soldiers buried there. Cecil is also remembered on the war memorial in North Luffenham.

sphinx-cap-badge-royal-lincs-regiment

The Royal Lincolnshire Regiment

25892 Private William Killips

William Killips and his younger brother, Cecil (See above) from North Luffenham both died in the First World War. William was born on 31 August 1891, at Carrickfergus, County Antrim, Ireland, and was a railway booking clerk.

Although he was the older brother, he enlisted six months after Cecil on 11 November 1915, and went out to France on 25 August 1916 with the 9th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. He was killed in the Battle of the Somme exactly a month after arriving on the Western Front, on 25 September.

The 9th Battalion had formed up in front of Gueudecourt in New Trench and Gap Trench the night before. The attack was to be carried out on a two platoon frontage in eight waves, at 250 yard intervals. The battalion war diary reports:

“The morning was spent making final preparations for the attack. Enemy shelling not heavy and a few casualties were sustained. Waves formed up in front of trenches. Advance commenced…enemy immediately commenced an extremely intense and deep barrage. First two platoons of D Coy reached Gird Trench but sustained heavy casualties. All Coy officers becoming casualties…Remnants of first two waves of C Coy reached Gird Trench but owing to machine gun fire on the right and the brigade on the right having failed to take Gird Trench, the party were all killed or wounded.”

The diary says a tank supported by a bombing party eventually cleared Gird Trench and took more than 350 prisoners. William was killed at some point during the morning.

He does not have a known grave but is remembered on Panel 3A of the Thiepval Memorial. He is also remembered on the war memorial at North Luffenham.

40264 Private William Kirby

William Kirby was born around Christmas 1895 in Wakerley and was baptised in the village on 5 January 1896. By 1901, when he was five, his parents William Senior (A shepherd) and Marion had moved to North Luffenham. Altogether they had eight children. William’s father died young because in the 1911 census Marion is listed as a widow, still living in North Luffenham with him and his two youngest siblings.

William was working as a farm labourer when he enlisted in Oakham. He served with the 7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment and died in the Battle of the Somme on 28 September 1916.

His battalion had taken part in an attack on Gueudecourt two days previously and was occupying Gird Trench which had been captured from the Germans. The battalion war diary for the period between 27 and 29 September simply says:

“Battalion remained in the same position. Nothing of importance occurred during this period. 48 casualties were sustained through shell fire.”

William was presumably one of these. He has no known grave and is remembered on Panel 3A of the Thiepval Memorial and in North Luffenham Church. After the war, his mother was recorded by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as living at 136, Dorset Street, Leicester.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 2

Field of Poppies

66112 Private John Alfred George Adams

John Alfred George Adams was the son of George Henry (A sawyer in the Timber Yard) and Kate Elizabeth Adams of North Luffenham. On the 1911 Census he was employed as an Under Waggoner on a Farm.

He enlisted in the Yorkshire Light Infantry on 24 June 1918. John trained as a Lewis gunner and went to France on 15 October 1918, where he was wounded in action by a bullet on 4 November.

He died at a hospital in Liverpool on the 14 November and is buried at North Luffenham. His headstone also commemorates his brother in law, John Cox, who had moved from North Luffenham to Derbyshire before joining the army and being killed at Ypres. (See Below)

jaga-jrc-memorial

21018 Private John Robert Cox

John Robert Cox was born in about 1889 in North Luffenham where his father (John Cox) worked as a Brickyard Labourer in the village brickworks.

At some point the family moved to Ilkeston in Derbyshire. John was married in 1913 to Christabel Adams, also from North Luffenham, whose brother John Adams, died three days after the Armistice from injuries he received in the war and is buried in the village churchyard.

John Cox served in the same Regiment as his brother-in-law which he had joined in January 1915. He went out to the Western Front on 21 May and was killed in September 1915 in the fighting around Ypres.  

He is buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, grave XI.E.23. John does not appear on any war memorial in Rutland although he is remembered on his brother-in-law’s headstone in North Luffenham Churchyard. After his death his widow remarried Mr JF Rose in 1922 and moved to Morcott.

43807 Lance Sergeant William Henry Delisle Alfin MM

William Henry Delisle Alfin MM was the son of Charles De L’ Alfin (A shepherd) and his wife, Harriett of North Luffenham and was born at Ketton on 10 October 1889.

He joined the 1st Battalion Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) on 13 March 1916, and went to the Western Front on 15 July.

A year later he won the Military Medal for bravery during the Third Battle of Ypres, beating off an enemy attack:

“South of Polygon Wood, on the 25 and 26 September 1917, this NCO performed very useful work by the skillful disposition of his Lewis gun team during the enemy’s attacks, remaining cool throughout, and accounting for many of the enemy. His bravery, cheerfulness and calmness were very inspiring throughout the action.”

He also took part in the Battle of Arras, and was killed by a shell on 26 October 1918, near High Wood on the Somme, less than three weeks before the Armistice.

He was 29 and is buried at Awoingt British Cemetery, grave II.B.22, and remembered on North Luffenham’s war memorial.

Field of Poppies

You can read more about all 16 from North Luffenham who fell during WWI from the series of posts published this week.

A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am on Sunday 13th November, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

Remembering Those That Fell During The First World War – Part 1

ww1-centenary-logoRemembrance Day is being marked this year on Sunday 13th November. A Service of Remembrance is being held in the Village Church at 10.45am, where we will be joined by local military units and youth groups and will commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts.

In this the 100th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme we will particularly remember those who died during the First World War.

During the coming week we will publish details of those 16 Villagers that died during that dreadful conflict.

armed-forces-memorial

The Battle of the Somme was one of the largest and most well-known battles of World War I. It lasted from 1st July to 18th November 1916 on the banks of the Somme River, in France.

It was also one of the bloodiest battles of the First World War, or of any war before or since.

An estimated 1,000,000 men were killed or wounded, including about 485,000 British and French troops. Further details can be found at: http://www.rutlandremembers.org.

VILLAGE PLAN – OPEN MEETING – MON 7th NOVEMBER 2016 AT 7.30pm

To help the Parish Council understand the future needs of the village and the aspirations of everyone that lives here we are planning to write a Village Plan. An initial “Open Meeting” to discuss how we are best to tackle this initiative is to be held in the Community Centre on Monday 7th November at 7.30pm. The meeting is open to all and we look forward to explaining what we hope to achieve and to seek input from a cross section of the village. More details are contained in the attached briefing note:

initial-village-plan-meeting-7-nov-16

Thanks Ian & Welcome Angela – Parish Clerk Handover

For the last 7 years Ian Ferguson has been the Parish Clerk and Responsible Financial Officer for the Parish Council. Handover - Ian and AngelaToday marks the formal handover of responsibilities between Ian and Angela .

During his tenure Ian has provided the interface between the Parish Council and the Village, as well as providing a link with Rutland County Council and a host of organisations that support the village.

Ian’s time in office has been marked by great professionalism, dedication and a willingness to go that extra mile to ensure that the Village gets a very special service. To thank him for this, the Parish Council hosted a farewell Dinner in The Fox earlier in the month attended by past and present Councillors.

Thank you Ian and Welcome to Angela.

Paul Cummings – Chair NLPC

” THE VILLAGE PLAN” – Volunteers Needed

 

“THE VILLAGE PLAN”

 The Parish Council has identified that to enable it to make strategic decisions about the development of the village and to manage its’ day to day business and meet the aspirations of villagers, it is important that a Village Plan be developed. The type of issues to be considered will include: environment; planning / development; transport and roads; recreational facilities; health; community issues; education; community safety; volunteers; senior citizens; youth / youth activities and any other issues considered relevant. We live in a beautiful place and our plan is likely to concentrate on how we can protect its character, influence any future proposed development and where appropriate enhance its facilities. We believe that our Village is a great place to live and would benefit from having a plan that identifies those things that must be protected or enhanced and those things that need to be improved for the greater good of the whole community. Over time we anticipate the Village Plan evolving into a Neighbourhood Plan, which includes some level statutory protection in terms of planning and development.

Researching, developing and writing such a plan is a major piece of work, that is likely to take a year or more to achieve. It needs to be undertaken by enthusiastic volunteers within the community and is not the sole responsibility of the Parish Council. We intend to enable everyone in the village to have a say and will actively encourage participation by all.

CAN YOU HELP?

We will need help in project management; the development of a questionnaire; analysis of findings and in conducting surveys and focus groups.

If you can help please contact: Paul Cummings (Tel: 720124 / pbgcummings@gmail.com) or Tim Smith (Tel: 360083 / tim.smith2818@btinternet.com)

 

Annual General Meeting of the Good Neighbour Scheme

North Luffenham

From: PBG Cummings

11 Digby Drive North Luffenham OAKHAM Rutland LE15 8JS

Tel: 01780 720124
Email: PAUL@paulcummings0.wanadoo.co.uk

8 September 2015

All Volunteers NLGNS Committee

NORTH LUFFENHAM GOOD NEIGHBOURS SCHEME ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING – 23 SEPTEMBER 2015

It really doesn’t seem possible, but it is exactly a year since Tim Smith and I popped our heads over the parapet and offered to try to set up a Good Neighbour Scheme for North Luffenham. In the past year the scheme has been established, reviewed and developed. In operation it has proved itself to be a much-needed asset to a small isolated village. However, there is still much more that can be done to further develop and hone the scheme to ensure that it can achieve its full potential.

I know that some volunteers will have been frustrated by the lack of ‘tasks’ that have come your way and it has taken longer than we expected for the scheme to become a trusted and established part of the village fabric. It is therefore time for us to have a good look at what is right/wrong and how the scheme might be improved.

When we started the scheme we agreed to take stock after a year and to allow our ‘Members’ (Volunteers and Users) to have a say in who they would like to manage the scheme and to propose new thoughts and ideas for its evolution. To this end we will hold an Annual General Meeting in the Community Centre at 7.30pm on Wed 23 Sep 15. I hope that you will be able to join us. I attach a draft Agenda for the meeting – if you have further points that you would wish to include do please let me know.

I have decided that having helped to get the scheme off the ground, it is time for someone else to take over as Chairman, this will also avoid any potential conflict of interest in my appointment as Chair of the Parish Council. I will of course remain a volunteer. May I take this opportunity to thank you all for your support and encouragement.

I look forward to seeing you on 23rd September at 7.30pm in the Community Centre

Introductions

DRAFT AGENDA

NORTH LUFFENHAM GOOD NEIGHBOUR SCHEME ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
TO BE HELD IN THE COMMUNITY CENTRE AT 7.30pm ON WEDNESDAY 23rd SEPTEMBER 2015

ITEM ONE – Chairman’s opening remarks
ITEM TWO – Report on progress
ITEM THREE – Finance report
ITEM FOUR – Election of Committee
ITEM FIVE – Review of NLGNS Scheme – What next
ITEM SIX – Presentation by Janice Wildermoth – First Call Rutland (British Red Cross) ITEM SEVEN – Presentation by Paula McKillop – Round Rutland

ITEM EIGHT – Any other business

Battle of Waterloo

North Luffenham SUMMER Concert AND PICNIC (In aid of the Church Roof Fund) To commemorate The 200th Anniversary of The Battle of Waterloo – 18th June 1815.

waterloo poster

On Saturday 20th June 2015 Stamford Brass will perform a Summer Concert on the grass outside the Parish Church.

Bring your tables, chairs, candles, drinks and a picnic for a memorable fun family evening 7pm – 9.30pm (Concert starts 7.30 pm)

Tickets – £10 and £3 (Under 16) all tickets sold in advance.

For tickets: Paul Cummings Tel: 720124 email: pbgcummings@gmail.com

Waterloo Medal

Fancy having your own Waterloo Medal than read on:

WATERLOO 200

The Waterloo 200 organisation will produce 500,000 replicas as part of events to mark anniversary of Wellington’s victory. It was the first medal issued by the British government to all soldiers who had fought in a battle, regardless of their rank. Now half a million Battle of Waterloo campaign medals are to be issued on a first-come, first-served basis to mark this year’s 200th anniversary of Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon.

waterloo medal

The Waterloo medal issued to soldiers who took part in the historic battle. Photograph: Alamy

Further details can be found at:   www.200waterloo.co.uk/